Sunday, April 20, 2014

backyard 2014 - part two

   Continuing with the backyard tour...  
 



  This first set is for my friend Sacha ,she is still in Turkey and needs a "green fix". =]

  I do think I need professional help... I spent this afternoon removing the smaller plants from underneath the trees and bushes along the fence because... all the dead debris on the ground was driving me crazy, it was too messy. So all the small plants had to go, I need to easily rake the debris up and get rid of it.
  I'm going with the story that the plants needed to be moved because they were not getting enough sun.



   I noticed that the blocks on one side of the round planter were crooked and wonky.
Phil O'Dendron has decided to bust out of the planter and grow where it chooses! The thing is there is no bottom to the planter so there was no reason for the roots to escape.



 
  The top two photos are the wisteria that until last month I didn't realize how big it was because most of it had grown into the neighbors lemon tree searching for more sunlight. The vine was 12 feet long by the time I had finished carefully untangling it. At some point I need to figure out what I'm going to do with it, but for now I am enjoying the lovely smell (and so are the bumble bees).
  The bottom two photos are the first (future) cherry and first strawberries. I'm hoping the extra heat will encourage the cherry tree to bloom like mad.
  



  This was growing in the backyard when we bought the house. It's a sad looking bush, all long, leggy and not much in the leaf department. If it wasn't for the gorgeous Snowball flowers it would have been mulch. I think I need to transplant it to a spot where it will get more sun or just let it get taller than the Camilla bush it's next too.  For the longest time I didn't try to figure out what it was called I just called it the Snowball Bush, which is the common name. =]


 
 
   I'm still amazed at how well the climbing rose is doing. The top photo is the one I posted on Day 1, I took it after I had removed all the dead flowers. The second photo with all the flowers and buds I took the very next day!! (I kid you not, cross my heart).




TTFN,
Chris =]


8 comments:

  1. I'm loving the green fix too. You've certainly been productive. That's a lot of hard work. We don't have foliage yet, but I the green is turning from muddy brown to slightly green. Keep the pics coming!

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    1. Your backyard will be at it's pretty best in no time.

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  2. Love the snowball flowers! I got all of 3 cherries from my tree this year :) Hope you get more!

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    1. I thought you would be buried in cherries since you live in a warmer section of Cali.

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  3. And I was getting all misty-eyed from the photos before I even read the text... Thank you! And now I'm so jealous!

    But I saw two birds today that I've never seen before, one looked like a kind of woodpecker, and the other like a flycatcher - both flashy and attractive. And I saw a red poppy growing in a clump of weeds. Unfortunately, they were all on the Garrison - no cameras allowed.

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    Replies
    1. Don't be jealous, you will be home soon and can surround yourself in sunflowers. You need a bird field guide book of Turkey. =]

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  4. roses grow off new wood so that may be why it was so happy! Your yard looks amazing!

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